How to Solve Most of Your Problems

In my consultancy work, I have learned that people don’t like their problems to be easy to solve, especially by others. For instance, many of them prefer talking for a whole hour about the way a certain problem affects their lives and doesn’t let them sleep, and because of that they can’t do this and that, and they can’t manage and are completely unhappy. Instead of staying quiet, listening and finding that their problem can be solved in one or two hours, by using a different approach, they waste their time. Of course, a solution usually costs money, especially when it is offered (and especially implemented) by somebody else. Whining, instead, is free. People don’t like to find out how simple and tiny their problems are according to the justified opinion of those who have viable solutions to these problems, because that would affect their ego.

When, for instance, you offer solution after solution to somebody telling you: “Yeah, but…” and rejecting with an unimaginable success all of yours, you should know that that person is not really looking for a solution but a lending ear to the importance of their own suffering. Women are specialists by far. They are also the clients most likely inclined to actually pay for the consultants’ bread to solve their problems, once correctly diagnosed.

If you are in the habit of letting yourself impressed by the weight of the problems that you raised while waiting, have a look at this little story. I hope it will make a great difference.

Also, I have terrible news for those of you who hope to be left with the same amount of problems after you completely read this post: if you also watch the video, which is about 2 minutes long, you stand no chance!

Do you still have problems? You are invited to consultancy.

Best wishes and have a bright day!

Marcus Victor Grant

Copyright © Marcus Victor Grant 2013-present Translation by Cristiana Brezeanu of the article “Cum să-ți rezolvi cele mai multe probleme“  published initially in Romanian at the 18th of March 2013 on Discerne. Copyright © Marcus Victor Grant, all rights reserved

The materials on this blog are subject to this disclaimer.

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