How to Make a Successful Presentation 1,2,3…

I published here the Romanian review of a book on public communication. Reading it, I have once again found that, for me, public presentations are as natural to me as drinking water. Thus, I have often held public presentations as far back as high school and I have personally attended thousands of public speeches since, enough for me to find my positive and negative models.

If you have decided to use audio-visual materials, the first thing you have to do, once you get to the presentation venue, is making sure these are operational. Here I mean extension cables, plugs, microphones, amplification system, codecs, streaming, visualization, resolution, embedding. A way of doing that is by testing the material under real conditions or asking somebody to do it for you. In any event, a good idea is to get from home: laptop, cables, extension cables, speakers, codecs and the entire arsenal implied by the “just in case” scenario. A common-sense condition regarding the use of audio-video materials is for them to work.

Another rule is to create the right state for the public, i.e. accordingly frame the intention to deliver such a material.

Nowadays, public speaking should be for a professional just as easy as riding a bike: once you learn it well, there are very slim chances for you to bump into other people!

 

1. The elements that should be considered in order to prepare a perfect presentation (list)

  • The arrangement of space, disposal of the location
  • Lighting in the presentation area
  • Distribution and source of light during the session
  • Structure of the hall
  • Positioning the speaking persons as compared to the listening persons
  • Structuring the presentation especially when it also supported by external video material (e.g. PowerPoint presentations, films)
  • Concluding with an invitation to action or a question that would arouse curiosity
  • Having more than 2-3 objectives in the presentation, not just one, but not more either. These objectives must be intercorrelated.
  • Making the presentation as short as possible and explaining what concept is by way of examples, metaphors or demonstrations
  • Non-verbally and actively communicating with the public, inviting them to a dialogue
  • Preparing and practicing delivering the presentation in advance, with critical feedback and possibly role-playing
  • Pitching the right public
  • Finding the key-language for the right public

 

2. Persons willing to learn

  • Persons willing to implement and experiment
  • Persons asking pertinent questions
  • Audience interested enough in the subject in order to use it, not just to make an appearance for an useless information filled meeting
  • Audience present here and now, offering real-time feedback
  • Audience that has money to buy services or products.

 

3. Rules regarding the use of audio-video materials within a presentation. Positive/negative experiences.

A fundamental rule is making sure they are operational. Here I mean extension cables, plugs, microphones, amplification system, codecs, streaming, visualization, resolution, embedding. A way of doing that is by testing the material under real conditions or asking somebody to do it for you. In any event, a good idea is to get from home: laptop, cables, extension cables, speakers, codecs and the entire arsenal implied by the “just in case” scenario. A common-sense condition regarding the use of audio-video materials is for them to work.

Another rule is to create the right state for the public, i.e. accordingly frame the intention to deliver such a material.

As a negative example from my personal experience, I once participated in a video competition, during which the evaluators had a DVD player in use that they did not know how to use. I found it ridiculous to be made to wait – considering the irony of the situation – until the technical supervisor came and explained to them how to press some buttons for simple orders.

1, 2, 3… START!

If you liked this article, then I also recommend:

The best educational program that I experienced in Romania

Efficient learning, more than accelerated reading!

The guide of the good-training consumer

Myths about training

I wish you memorable speeches!

Happy public speaking!

Marcus Victor Grant

Text Copyright © Marcus Victor Grant 2011-present. Translation by Cristiana Brezeanu of the article “Cum sa faci o prezentare de succes 1,2,3…“  published in Romanian at the 6th of September 2011 on Discerne. Text Copyright © Marcus Victor Grant, all rights reserved.

The materials on this blog are subject to this disclaimer.

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